Emily Lawrence

CHIHULY at the ROM

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by Emily Lawrence

Chihuly is an artist who capitalizes on the “wow factor”—everything is larger than life, brighter than life, and leaves the viewer questioning how on earth a material as fragile as glass could be molded into so many different forms

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The Idea of North: The Paintings of Lawren Harris at the AGO

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by Emily Lawrence

The show seems aware of the problematic aspects of Harris, but is overly polite in its explanations and is seemingly too timid to push further—perhaps in fear of appearing blasphemous against one of Canada’s most famous artists.

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Adam Lee: Of A Great and Mighty Shadow at Angell Gallery

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by Emily Lawrence

Interested in the idea of shadows and how they cast over the histories and lives of people, Lee’s paintings create links between the past, the present, and the future.

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CONTACT 2016 / Artoronto picks

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Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival
May, 2016 / Toronto and GTA


With so much choices, with well over 1500 Canadian and international artists and photographers exhibiting at more than 200 exhibitions, it isn’t easy picking exhibits to see.

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Marvin Luvualu Antonio at Clint Roenisch Gallery

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by Emily Lawrence

Each work in the show is a sign of humanity and the struggles that come along with it, as themes of cultural appropriation, racial politics, identity, and capitalism are addressed through Antonio’s work

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Baleful at Pari Nadimi Gallery

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by Emily Lawrence

Baleful may evoke heavy themes, but the idea that inanimate objects can live, die, and experience reincarnation (or in this case, get repurposed into works of art) is a thoughtful and optimistic concept.

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Material Girls at Doris McCarthy Gallery

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by Emily Lawrence

Most importantly, the show finds unity in its overarching theme of women taking up space, both literally and figuratively.

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